Large collection of Mathematica and Wolfram Language-based books and references written by leading experts. Search by topic or language. Description. As both a highly readable tutorial and a definitive reference for over a million Mathematica users worldwide, this book covers every aspect of. This adaptation of Mathematica: A System for Doing Mathematics by Computer is the Offers a shorter and simpler version of the original book, leaving out.

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    Wolfram Mathematica Book

    [email protected] In publications that refer to the Mathematica system, please cite this book as: Stephen Wolfram, The Mathematica Book, 5th ed. Bibliographic publication history of The Mathematica Book, the groundbreaking documentation for Mathematica software, with links to online versions. download The MATHEMATICA ® Book, Version 4 on reobardhariho.cf ✓ FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

    Includes index. ISBN 1———3 hardbound. Mathematica Computer file 2. Mathematics—Data processing. W65 All rights reserved.

    The goal of the book is to take people from zero to the point where they know enough about the Wolfram Language that they can routinely use it to create programs for things they want to do. This is a book for everyone. It just starts from scratch and explains things. In the past, a book like this would have been inconceivable. But now we have the Wolfram Language. But how should one actually do it? What should one explain, in what order?

    Those were challenges I had to address to write this book. There are two great things about the Wolfram Language that make this really work. And second, that the language can be purely functional, so that everything is stateless, and every input can be self contained.

    Where to Start? OK, but where should one start? What I decided to do was to go immediately to the idea of functions —and to first introduce them in terms of arithmetic. So as a slightly more exciting function, what I introduce next is RandomInteger —which people often like to run over and over again, to see what it produces.

    OK, so what next? The obvious answer is that we have to introduce lists. But what should one do with lists? So instead what I decided was to make the very first function I show for lists be ListPlot. Actually, the best extremely simple example of that is Range , which I also show at this point. But OK, so now we want to reinforce the idea of functions, and functions working together. And, of course, whatever computations one does, one can immediately see the results, either symbolically or visually.

    I start with trivial versions of Table , without any iteration variable. Of course, the fact that it can do this is a consequence of the fundamentally symbolic character of the Wolfram Language. The next big step is to introduce a variable into Table.

    I thought a lot about how to do this, and decided that the best thing to show first is the purely symbolic version. The Arc of the Book In the first few sections of the book, the raw material for our computations is basically numbers and lists. What I wanted to do next was to show that there are other things to compute with. I chose colors as the first example.

    Colors are good because a everyone knows what they are, b you can actually compute with them and c they make colorful output! People have seen interactive interfaces in lots of consumer software. The next, perhaps surprising thing I introduce in the book is image processing. And what people see are just functions—like Blur and ColorNegate —whose purposes are easy to understand. I needed a sample image for the section, so, yes, I just snapped one right there—of me working on the book.

    Next I talk about strings and text. String operations on their own are pretty dry. Next I cover sound , and talk about how to generate sequences of musical notes.

    The Mathematica Book, Fifth Edition

    For example, the names of musical notes are specified as strings—so one has to have talked about strings before musical notes. By this point in the book, people already know how to do some useful and real things with the Wolfram Language. So I made the next section a kind of interlude—a meta-section that gives a sense of the overall scope of the Wolfram Language, and also shows how to find information on specific topics and functions.

    Lots of real-world data involves units—so the next section is devoted to working with units. After that I talk about dates and times. The Wolfram Language is big.

    One of the important objectives in the book is to cover these ideas. Of course, it helps a lot that the language can manipulate them directly, as just another example of symbolic objects. But even though the internal algorithms for machine learning are complicated, the actual functions that do it in the Wolfram Language are perfectly easy to understand.

    Throughout the book, I try to keep things as simple as possible. Functional Programming The next few sections tackle the important and incredibly powerful topic of functional programming. In the past, functional programming tended to be viewed as a sophisticated topic—and certainly not something to teach people who are first learning about programming.

    I start by just talking more abstractly about the process of applying a function. But OK, so now we want to reinforce the idea of functions, and functions working together.

    Wolfram Media: Title: The Mathematica Book, Fifth Edition

    And, of course, whatever computations one does, one can immediately see the results, either symbolically or visually. I start with trivial versions of Table , without any iteration variable. Of course, the fact that it can do this is a consequence of the fundamentally symbolic character of the Wolfram Language. The next big step is to introduce a variable into Table. I thought a lot about how to do this, and decided that the best thing to show first is the purely symbolic version.

    The Arc of the Book In the first few sections of the book, the raw material for our computations is basically numbers and lists. What I wanted to do next was to show that there are other things to compute with. I chose colors as the first example. Colors are good because a everyone knows what they are, b you can actually compute with them and c they make colorful output! People have seen interactive interfaces in lots of consumer software. The next, perhaps surprising thing I introduce in the book is image processing.

    And what people see are just functions—like Blur and ColorNegate —whose purposes are easy to understand. I needed a sample image for the section, so, yes, I just snapped one right there—of me working on the book. Next I talk about strings and text. String operations on their own are pretty dry. Next I cover sound , and talk about how to generate sequences of musical notes.

    For example, the names of musical notes are specified as strings—so one has to have talked about strings before musical notes. By this point in the book, people already know how to do some useful and real things with the Wolfram Language.

    The Mathematica Book

    So I made the next section a kind of interlude—a meta-section that gives a sense of the overall scope of the Wolfram Language, and also shows how to find information on specific topics and functions. Lots of real-world data involves units—so the next section is devoted to working with units.

    After that I talk about dates and times. The Wolfram Language is big. One of the important objectives in the book is to cover these ideas. Of course, it helps a lot that the language can manipulate them directly, as just another example of symbolic objects. But even though the internal algorithms for machine learning are complicated, the actual functions that do it in the Wolfram Language are perfectly easy to understand.

    Throughout the book, I try to keep things as simple as possible.

    Functional Programming The next few sections tackle the important and incredibly powerful topic of functional programming. In the past, functional programming tended to be viewed as a sophisticated topic—and certainly not something to teach people who are first learning about programming. I start by just talking more abstractly about the process of applying a function.

    The big thing this does is set me up to talk about pure anonymous functions. The next section is where some of the real power of functional programming starts to shine through. In the abstract, functions like NestList and NestGraph sound pretty complicated and abstract. The next several sections cover areas of the language that are unlocked as soon as one understands pure functions.

    There are lots of powerful programming techniques that emerge from a smaller number of ideas. After functional programming, the next big topics are patterns and pattern-based programming. What makes patterns so powerful in the Wolfram Language is something much more fundamental: the uniform structure of everything in the language, based on symbolic expressions. If I were writing a formal specification of the Wolfram Language, I would start with symbolic expressions.

    And I might do the same if I were writing a book for theoretical computer scientists or pure mathematicians. There are a few more pieces to put in place to get there. I talk about associations —and then I talk about natural language understanding. Internally, the way natural language understanding works is complex.

    OK, so now everything is ready to talk about deploying things to the web. And at this point, people will be able to start creating useful, practical pieces of software that they can share with the world. Because in the Wolfram Language you can do an amazing amount—including for example deploying a complete web app—without ever needing to assign a value to a variable.

    But the last few sections of the book cover some important practical extensions. And they provide an interesting example that makes use of many different ideas from the Wolfram Language. Essay Sections At the end of the book, I have what are basically essay sections: about writing good code , about debugging and about being a programmer.

    My goal in these sections is to build on the way of thinking that I hope people have developed from reading the rest of the book, and then to communicate some more abstract principles.

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